Ak Shara Foundation Blog Fiberglass Insulation Dangers

Fiberglass Insulation Dangers

fiberglass insulation danger

Fiberglass insulation danger has been used in homes for more than a century and rose to prominence as an alternative to asbestos insulation because it is safer. It is important to remember, though, that it does not come without its risks. Fiberglass can contaminate air, leading to skin irritation and breathing issues if not handled properly. It can also become moldy if it becomes wet and release tiny fiberglass particles into the air.

Whether you are working with rolled fiberglass, also known as batting or the loose fill that is blown into place with special equipment, it is essential to wear proper safety gear when handling it. You should wear gloves and long-sleeved shirts, and tuck your sleeves into the gloves to prevent exposing your skin. You should also use a face mask and goggles to protect your eyes. If you are going to be working with a lot of insulation, consider investing in a respirator that can help filter the small fiberglass fibers before you start working.

Safety First: Understanding the Fire Risk of Loft Insulation Materials

While there is no evidence of long-term harm from touching fiberglass, it can irritate your skin and make you itch for hours or even days after you handle it. This is because the material is composed of minuscule glass shards that cut you if they get into your skin. You should also avoid ingesting the material as it can cause stomach pains and other internal inflammation. It is possible to avoid fiberglass insulation dangers and still have a safe and energy-efficient home by opting for alternative, eco-friendly options such as wool or recycled denim cellulose insulation.

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