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PROGRAM REPORTS
PROGRAM STATISTICS
   
 

Outcome

Numbers and Success

Reading Programme 2005 - Consolidation
  Before After 45th Story Card
Level
No. of Children
%
Level
No. of Children
%
0
746
16%
P

44

6%

S

132

18%

W

248

33%

L

162

22%

O

90

12%

AB

70

9%

Letter
1627
36%
P

326

20%

S

570

35%

W

467

29%

L

146

9%

AB

118

7%

Word
2163
48%
P

847

39%

S

857

40%

W

332

15%

AB

127

6%

Total
4536
100%
4536
 

Impact of the programme

Nearly 61 % of the children from different levels have begun to read simple sentences/paragraphs over a span of 45 days. There has been an overall improvement of 88 % in the learning levels of the children. In the zero level categories, 24 % children have begun to read simple sentences/paragraphs. It is also noted that the Urdu school going children have fared better in comparison to the Kannada school going children in their respective languages.

 

Reading Programme 2005 Assessments Urdu Schools South 02
  Before After 45th Story Card
Level
No. of Children
%
Level
No. of Children
%
0
73
5.51%
P

13

18%

S

15

21%

W

28

38%

L

7

10%

O

5

7%

AB

5

7%

Letter
573
43%
P

143

25%

S

213

37%

W

142

25%

L

33

6%

AB

42

7%

Word
677
51.1%
P

277

41%

S

251

37%

W

106

16%

AB

53

6%

Total
1323
99.99%
1323
 

Reading Programme 2005 Assessments Urdu Schools North 02
  Before After 45th Story Card
Level
No. of Children
%
Level
No. of Children
%
0
43
12.79%
P

10

23%

S

18

42%

W

9

21%

L

4

9%

O

1

2%

AB

1

2%

Letter
90
27%
P

26

29%

S

26

29%

W

30

33%

L

5

6%

AB

3

3%

Word
203
60.40%
P

119

59%

S

62

31%

W

16

8%

AB

6

3%

Total
336
99.97%
336
 

Reading Programme 2005 Assessments Kannada & Tamil Schools South 02
  Before After 45th Story Card
Level
No. of Children
%
Level
No. of Children
%
0
304
19.31%
P

5

2%

S

53

17%

W

110

36%

L

75

25%

O

33

11%

AB

28

9%

Letter
546
35%
P

65

12%

S

187

34%

W

188

34%

L

75

14%

AB

31

6%

Word
724
45.99%
P

205

28%

S

334

46%

W

148

20%

AB

37

5%

Total
1574
100.3%
1574
 

Reading Programme 2005 Assessments Kannada & Tamil Schools North 02
  Before After 45th Story Card
Level
No. of Children
%
Level
No. of Children
%
0
326
25.01%
P

16

5%

S

46

16%

W

101

35%

L

76

26%

O

51

18%

AB

36

 

Letter
418
32%
P

92

24%

S

144

38%

W

107

28%

L

33

9%

AB

42

 

Word
559
42.90%
P

246

47%

S

210

41%

W

62

12%

AB

41

 

Total
1303
1303
 
 
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Case Studies

a) Prestha – light in her eyes

Fair, light eyed, 8-year-old Prestha mingles with children of her age at the Government Kannada Higher Primary School, Marenahalli. But for her complexion, she is like any other child. A brief interaction & you unearth an interesting fact – this is Prestha’s first schooling exposure! Her parents have migrated from Hissar in Haryana to make home at Marenahalli. Her father is a carpenter, while her mother stays home to cook meals for the children.

She was enrolled in this government school, thanks to an extremely proactive principal. Dull-eyed Prestha watched other school kids playing from behind the electric pole adjacent to the school playground. The principal noticed her, counseled her parents and finally got her (with her two elder brothers) enrolled into school in November 2004. Prestha is a Class 2 student.

On joining school, incidentally she was right in time for the reading programme. Qualifying as an 0 level child, her tryst with Kannada letters & words began in ARP classes. The start was difficult; unable to comprehend anything, her interest to concentrate dipped downward. She carried the cards home routinely, watched them intently – as they were colorful; her brothers at home (also enrolled in the same school), were in the same learning boat. Every evening, they sat together gaping at the story cards. But soon, their curiosity to understand the story grew. Prestha’s eldest brother approached a neighbor asking for help. Slowly, the neighbor’s involvement became a daily event. The three children with another boy of their age met up every evening to learn a new story. The interaction was promising.

Prestha waited to bring home the story cards each day; she would not miss school a single day. “Initially she was very shy, but after a week she would demand the card & take it from me” says Parvathamma, ARP teacher at the school. But after the 30th story-card, the change was even more noticeable.” An unusual spark lit her eyes. Her 38th story-card assessment indicated that she had moved from 0 to L level. The sense of achievement was palpable as she jumped & played, walked & talked hugging the story card – like it was her personal weapon. She would just not let go.

The reading programme was completed – 45 story cards distributed. But for Prestha, her take-home is life-long confidence. The stories may fade in her mind, but the confidence she gained may never leave her. Indeed a miracle for the young girl!

b) Motivation – held the key

At the Railway colony school, the classroom is small, closeted & box-like. A low roof, with alphabet charts crisscrossing the ceiling; the walls are covered with charts of various types & size. In the small room are 19 children (Class2-5) braving the afternoon heat, seated in an Accelerated Reading Programme class. Notwithstanding the obvious space constraint, Parimala, their teacher tries and makes them sit in a semi-circle. Little Nagesh a tiny boy much smaller in appearance than his peers is upset as he gets pushed around. His hands are folded; he guards his alphabet flash card very close to his heart. “Miss, I made these flashcards using some scrap cardboard from the dust bin. See miss, I have stuck the alphabet on the card with ragi mudde. Isn’t it nice?” he asks, innocently. The teacher is thrilled. All the children clap for little Nagesh. He smiles shyly.

This ARP class isn’t like any other; thanks to a very dynamic teacher. A senior teacher at the fag end of her career, Parimala has few who believed in the potential of the ARP from the very beginning. “Even after so many years of teaching, every day I feel what I have done is not enough. The ARP is a boon for government school children. They are really learning a lot,” she says. Apart from the prescribed methodology, the enterprising teacher has even written songs to summarize each story card. At the end of class everyday, children sing the story. Besides this, she maintains a daily diary to document changes in each child & any ot interesting incident during class.
The children love her class. As she completes the 45 story cards, children are upset that no more cards will come their way. But a distinct sense of learning remains well imprinted in their young minds.

c) Kunal – student or teacher?

7 year old Kunal is a Class 2 student at GKHPS, GKR galli. Essentially the colorful cards kindled his interest in the reading programme. “They are so beautiful. I feel like simply looking at them,” he confesses. Averaging in his academics, Kunal studies in a Kannada medium school although he comes from a Tamilian household. His father is a daily wageworker at a construction site, which he also guards by night as a watchman. The family stays atop the tall building. Nobody has been to school before Kunal in the family. Indeed a matter of pride, as his mother Chellamma says, “we didn’t study in our childhood. We want Kunal to study; he should study Kannada, as he needs to live here all his life.”

Kunal’s association with ARP began in January this year. The story cards fascinated him. Each day he would head back home with the cards and place them inside the only trunk that his family owned. “He wont even let me touch the cards,” adds his mother. When we finish dinner, & his father sits under the skylight getting ready to head for his night duty, little Kunal commences the reading class at home. He apes his teacher in totality. Points to the words, reads aloud, waits for his father to repeat, & actually mimics a full ARP class. Over time, this became a regular after dinner activity for the father & son. “In the beginning, we would feel bad that we can’t correct him when he reads. We were ashamed of ourselves. I never imagined that my son would teach me to read. I am proud to say that these story cards have helped me also learn Kannada” expresses Kumar, his father.

Spin-offs from ARP

  • Children are more regular to school; attendance has improved drastically.
  • Children have become interested in reading; this can be observed from the fact that children enrolled in ARP have been referring and borrowing books from Akshara Education Resource Center libraries, set up in schools, more frequently than the others.
  • Parents have been involved to the extent that children share their reading cards and help illiterate parents read and vice versa.
  • Teachers feel better bonding with children in their class. Children are by far more attentive.
  • With increased self-confidence, the slow learners are mingling better with their peers in class.
  • The District Committee’s of Karnataka State have included the reading programmeme as part of their annual plan under SSA for the year 2005.
  • The State Project Director, SSA has in principle decided to implement the programme across the entire state of Karnataka.
  • The ARP will soon be carried forward to other states, as it is an easily replicable private public partnership model.
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